Every Nation

The God Who Answers With Fire

This is a testimony.

The last time I gave a testimony, I was on a high from answered prayers and excellent performance. The tail end of 2017 produced breakthrough after breakthrough, in miraculous circumstances, and I–along with the people around me–was confident that it would only get better from there.

I was hopeful, in 2018, that we would only see success after success.

…that was not what happened.

The Bible says that we’re not supposed to make a show of praying and fasting, but considering my church has a hashtag for every year–this year’s is #ENfast2019–I don’t think it’s wrong to reveal that this is exactly what I’m doing right now. I’m praying and fasting, and it feels too early to be having breakthroughs (those usually come during the last night of the fast, which this year is this coming Friday), but I don’t know what else to call this. When I last shared a testimony, it was God making clear that he can move mountains, that he can deliver victories when all expect defeat.

That was 2017.

In 2018, he taught me something else: that he can deliver victory *in* defeat.

At the beginning of 2018, for the first time ever, I asked God for a word to define my year. He answered immediately–which is rare for Him, He usually likes to make me wait–and clearly. The word was pruning, which is not a word that usually excites Christians, but it excited me because I felt that it meant he was going to remove all the other responsibilities and tasks and work from my life that wasn’t connected to the one big thing that I was meant to do (I was sure this was music-related.). I believed that I would exit 2018 with a clear idea of my purpose, my future, and what I was going to be doing on this earth.

…that was not what happened.

In 2018, every single month of the year, nothing I had planned managed to happen. I fell short on my work goals, struggled through music school, found myself functionally demoted at work (people had to keep being hired on top of me as my shortcomings became evident), and exited 2018 with nothing to show for my promise or my struggles. From the girl with all the potential, I was reduced to someone no longer competent and full of ideas, the way I used to be. I was not the “superstar,” the “rockstar,” the girl with the plans who made things happen. I was the kind of person who claimed a Joseph anointing, that God would manifest himself by making me excellent wherever I went. In hindsight, that was arrogance: I was arrogant, belligerent, disrespectful of authority, convinced that I was the best because I was “blessed.”

At the lowest point of 2018, I found myself grappling with a depression so deep it rendered me numb. I’ve mentioned having been diagnosed in 2017 as having dysthymia, which is a mild and cyclical form of depression, but this felt anything but mild. I was bitter. I had no energy to do anything. I was weak and constantly on the verge of crying or else flying into a rage. I felt like I wasn’t in control of myself, and that it took all my energy just to look “normal” so I wouldn’t hurt anyone (with varying degrees of success). I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that 2018 crushed me, such that I would repeat to my mother over and over that I had lost the sense of who I was and now felt helpless.

As part of preparing for Prayer and Fasting, I took some time to reflect on 2018 and everything that had happened. It was then that I found the journal entry listing my word for the year: pruning.

Right then, it hit me.

I don’t know what else you could call what I’d experienced as anything but just that: pruning. God wasn’t going to remove tasks from me, because God is not a God of to do lists. Instead, I realized God is more concerned with who I would be in Him, and so he painfully, brutally tore away and burned and broke off everything that would hinder me from being who I needed to be in him: dependent, submitted, reliant, humbled. I have always struggled with depending on God, because I have always been so competent.

Well, there’s no question of that now.

As I was doing devotions today, it hit me that everything I thought was a setback last year was instead a manifestation of God’s promise. He promised to prune me. And he delivered. I know it sounds crazy, considering what a painful year I had, how humbling it was, how terrifying the future now seems. And yet, for the first time in maybe ever, it feels like I have nothing to be afraid of, because for the first time in a long time I know something for sure: God does what He says He will. He promised to prune me, and he did that. He made a promise and he kept it. God is a God who keeps His word.

The last time I can remember being filled with faith was after my Seoul trip with Esther. During that trip, I got a sense that I was called to go into ministry involving the arts, that said ministry would be connected to mental health, and that possibly said ministry would be reaching out to the youth using music in countries that were not my own. In the depths of my depression, I questioned whether God could even use me for ministry at all, whether or not I had made that declaration of a calling “too early” because I was such a vulnerable, broken, unstable mess that I couldn’t see God using me. Now I realize that it isn’t about my state of “suitability,” but about what He says he will do. He made me a musician. He made me a storyteller. He gave me this heart, no matter how weak and fragile its beat is. He knows about my illnesses, my hangups, my frailties. Knowing all that, He decides the calling. And, after the 2018 I have just had, I think I have it loud and clear that He will do what He says He will do, regardless of what the world says, and regardless of my expectations.

I asked God what His word for me is in 2019. Like the last time, he answered immediately. Like the last time, he answered clearly. The word for 2019 was PROMISE, the verse accompanying it one that I used to consider a cliche: “‘For I know the plans I have for you,” says the LORD, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you. Plans to give you a hope and a future.'” (Jeremiah 29:11) I used to dismiss that verse as banal encouragement, but today it sounds instead like a war cry, a declaration of authority, of God saying “I know the plans I have for you. You don’t know them, but I do.”

God is a God of His Word, and His Word is a promise. I may not know what that promise looks like, but He does. And I know for sure that He always does what He says He will. All I need is to follow where He leads, trusting that I do not need to know because he does.

The first ever spoken word verse I wrote went something like this: “I serve a God who answers with fire.”

In the darkest moments of 2018, terrified and broken and uncertain, I would find myself crying out to God: “Lord, I cannot move unless you move. I will not go anywhere without you.”

It wasn’t a question, but I think I have an answer. “From here on out,” God says, “You will never have to.”

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EN2010: Amazing Grace was never so Amazing

So in case you haven’t read about it yet on the Philippine Star’s website, last Friday, the Every Nation group of churches (my church, Victory Christian Fellowship, being a member of this group) set a new world record for the most languages sung in a single song. The event was our World Convergence, which we have every three years to celebrate how God has strengthened our church across nations.

It. Was. Amazing.

Fifty different tongues all praising God in one of the most widely-known and widely-translated Christian hymns of all time — the sound was like you could only IMAGINE Revelation would sound like. Here is the complete list of languages, courtesy of the EN2010 website:

Full list of languages performed by Every Nation at EN2010:

  1. English
  2. Yoruba
  3. Japanese
  4. Zulu
  5. Spanish
  6. Mandarin
  7. Hindi
  8. Korean
  9. Persian
  10. Samoan
  11. Afrikaans
  12. Arabic
  13. Thai
  14. Ibo
  15. Cherokee
  16. Tagalog
  17. Greek
  18. Italian
  19. French
  20. Russian
  21. Burmese
  22. Swedish
  23. Norwegian
  24. Irish
  25. Hawaiian
  26. Dutch
  27. German
  28. Cantonese
  29. Bengali
  30. Setswana
  31. Portuguese
  32. Turkish
  33. Maori
  34. Tongan
  35. Malaysian
  36. Vietnamese
  37. Lao
  38. Cebuano
  39. Nepali
  40. Mongolian
  41. Indonesian
  42. Hokkien
  43. Xhosa
  44. Konkani
  45. Marathi
  46. Gujarati
  47. Lotha-Naga
  48. Tankhul
  49. Manipuri
  50. Sign language

Probably the most tearjerking was it being sung in Cherokee, because if you’ve studied American History, you’ll know this factoid (again stolen from the EN2010 website).

The Story of Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace was written by John Newton, a former slave ship captain who came to Christ. Many people believe the melody of Amazing Grace is actually an old African folk song that Newton would have heard as the singing of the slaves wafted up from the hold of his slave ship. One of the most beloved Christian songs, Amazing Grace has been translated into almost every language in every nation. It is also referred to as the “National Anthem” of the Cherokee Indians, who sang Amazing Grace to encourage one another on the “Trail of Tears” as they were led on a forced relocation of almost 2,000 km on which 4,000 men, women and children perished.

I’m still feeling the aftershocks of what truly was a paradigm-shifting experience. Stay tuned for my EN2010 photoblog post!

~NC